Camp Staff FAQs
Diabetes Management FAQs
Other FAQs
    • Can the camp handle my child's dietary needs?

      See Answer

      Yes, all camps have dietitian’s dietitians that handle dietary issues and meal planning.  No parent should worry about special dietary needs such as celiac, lactose intolerance or peanut allergies.  These questions will be part of the application process, but do not be afraid to call and discuss this with the team.

    • Will they know about insulin pumps?

      See Answer

      Yes, healthcare teams at diabetes camp (endocrinologists, diabetes educators, nurses) supervise and closely monitor campers on insulin pumps.

    • Do I send snacks and low blood sugar treatment?

      See Answer

      Most camps ask parents not to send any food items.  Snacks and low treatment supplies of various kinds are available throughout camp and used according to specific policies and protocols.

    • Do I send all of my child's diabetes supplies to camp?

      See Answer

      Most resident camps provide all diabetes supplies, but you should call ahead to make sure that this is the case. Some day programs do not provide diabetes supplies. The camp paperwork should give specific instructions.

    • How much diabetes education will be provided?

      See Answer

      Diabetes education at camp happens in a variety of ways.  Teachable moments occur throughout the camp day – i.e. when a child has a low blood sugar from swimming and chats with a counselor about how to treat it – and during diabetes activities, created over decades of fun by diabetes camps everywhere.  Professionals will sometimes do special topic discussions, too.  It’s a mix of active learning, spontaneous education and planned instruction – at diabetes management times and throughout the day.

    • When my child starts camp, is there a standard change in insulin, such as a basal reduction?

      See Answer

      Because camp can be more active than home for many children (just walking to the dining hall is a lot farther than walking to the dining room – plus constant activities), camps may suggest a small reduction in insulin dose. Speak with the healthcare team about your child’s activity level at home and whether you feel this is appropriate.

    • How often will you check my child’s blood sugar? Any midnight/ 2 am checks?

      See Answer

      Standardly, most camps check blood glucose before breakfast, mid-morning, before lunch, , mid-afternoon, before dinner, before bedtime and at 2 AM, if blood glucose at bedtime is below a certain standard set by the healthcare team and/or the parents.

    • What is the target range for blood sugars at camp?

      See Answer

      Target blood sugar ranges should be decided by the healthcare team, the camper and the camper’s parents.

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